Masters in International Business Law

#1

This particular degree has a great deal of relevance in today’s business world. would you not agree?

I was looking at this area of law as I am interested in International Accounting Standards and wondered how this related to the area of International Law. was the legal profession focusing on this and was there a degree that was targeted in this area. Most law degrees seemed to have a focus on UK and European Law and I felt that was a little insular today. Guess what? I found a degree run by London School of Business and Finance through The University of Bradford with a programme designed to reflect the modern international marketplace and aimed at giving business leaders a solid grasp of the legal processes that govern business in the modern global marketplace.

The program concentrates on key areas of international business law, investigating its impact on the overall control of UK, European and international business and social enterprises. Core subjects include international trade law, competition law, and corporate governance and examining the ways in which international law impacts business practices. Two specialist modules are also available.

I am interested that as well as this clearly being suitable for budding lawyers there is the comment on the Web site that this particular course of studies would be suitable for those studying accountancy. Now when I was studying this was not an option, but as an accountant I can see tremendous value to this.

What do others think of this course please?

#2

I am glad that Pomponian has brought this topic to the fore as it is something which is advancing in the university faculties as a whole and also in the respected business schools. The way in which universities are now having to adopt the global economy and the challenges that they bring is very much at the forefront of academic review. As so many PLCs are now furthering their multinational approach as are banks there is a need for both lawyers and accountants to recognise that International Law has a very important role to play and that it is not something that in the words of the great Bill McClaren “cannot be learnt on the hoof”. There are many specialist areas that require a definite knowledge and of course there are dealings with countries which have yet to adopt universally accepted laws. I myself have spent a large amount of time in the mining industry and this operates in a whole number of former CIS countries which have underdeveloped laws. They need to be brought alongside of the generally accepted international laws and students that study this degree, whilst understanding they may choose practice have the most marvellous opportunities with multinationals. This degree is to some extent still developing but I would encourage students to look closely at this as they can advance their careers whilst at the same time add to the world economy.

#3

You simply cannot ignore the international element associated with both business and law these days and I would argue that any course whether it is labelled as such or not should have a high level of international study about it. Almost all organisations in my experience are keen to see individuals with international knowledge, understanding and doing a degree that specifically deals with international issues can only be a good thing.
That said it may be limiting individuals a bit too much and maybe just doing a few international units may be better particularly for those who don’t necessarily want to work in an international firm or don’t have the language skills to back it up.
Just my thoughts
S

#4

I have spent a large amount of time in both Russia and Kazakhstan and thus am in a position to appreciate the benefit of such a degree.
If I refer specifically to Kazakhstan I was involved in the establishment of a mine site and the need for a full understanding of international law was very apparent. There is contract law, ecology law, accounting law, taxation law and export law. These are just a few areas where a knowledge of international law are applicable. The law surrounding the way in which a mine can be established is vast and the Ecological and Environmental Laws are various across international boundaries. Contract law whilst having underlying similarities does vary from country to country and the cross border implications need to be fully understood.
This degree in my view is a big step forward and with an ever increasing cross border trade and particularly remembering the trade growth with Eastern European countries and China and South Korea this degree has a definite place in a university syllabus and should be developed and I have seen and can see the dangers of a lack of international focus where law is concerned.

#5

Being a degree holder is a very big achievement already, having surpassed all the trial is 4 year degree course is not easy how much more getting another years to study Masters in International Business Law is a bit confusing and not an easy one, but I think anyone who is determined to get what he/she wants can get it with hardship and perseverance.