How to get IN


#1

Hi,

Could I have some advise on applications please?

Thanks


#2

Sorry to hear you’re having a tough time. Law IS tough. It’s not my field of expertise, but finance is. If I were you I would try and be specific as possible when applying. I would also recommend going and doing an internship or work experience, because this will put big names on your CV and show you’re committed. If you have any contacts in these firms, they can probably help you arrange this.

Financial sectors are very competitive and you can expect to have to have a long line of “no’s” followed by a single “yes”.

I hope you realise that law work in financial services is an extremely difficult existence!


#3

Thank you for the advice…


#4

It sounds like you really need to narrow down and focus your approach on this. You have experience and a qualification and I know, for a fact, that you can get a great job in the city, although you might have to spend a few more years working from the ground up for it.

However, I think you need to really make an action plan. Take some time to de-stress, take a breather and then start researching all the law firms you can. Find firms which you feel are best suited to your background and your requirements and then call these firms and discuss your situation. Get all you can from HR at these firms (that’s what they are there for) and then tailor your applications and covering letters accordingly. Spend all the time you need (don’t rush) on your applications and covering letters. Feel free to check drafts on here or with friends, or even careers advisers at ILEX.

Really, you need to start building contacts with people at the companies you want to work for. It might be an idea to join some kind of law society or london based meet up group for lawyers - network - make contacts - these will be unbelievably useful to you, especially if you are having a hard time with applications/interviews right now.

You can do it!

Ed


#5

Thanks, thats brill. I have to say that ILEX are useless for help, I have contacted them many times without so much as a reply.

Networking, yes I have heard that it is always a good idea, I’ll look into this!

I get worried about contacting HR by phone as they always seem busy, but I will try again. So you think telephone HR first then apply accordingly?

Thanks again for your advice, Rebecca


#6

Don’t worry about law HR being busy, they are always busy, just keep calling!

In so far as looking for contacts; try calling your university careers service; they usually do have contacts through alumni and so on; you might only get to talk to someone on the phone in the profession, but their advice is worth its weight.


#7

I’m not at uni, and ILEX are quite useless with requests like that. I could however, ask my lecturer who is really nice. Thanks again!


#8

Even ifyou’re not at uni, typically your university careers service will offer you a full service for 3 years or so after you graduate, and then a lesser service for years afterwards.


#9

I think she means she’s not beed to Uni - is that right Rebecca? If ILEX are crap on the email then call them, or visit them. You’re paying these guys wages - they work for you!! …I recommend going in to see them and organising a meeting right then and there.

Don’t be shy talking to lecturers either. These guys often know more than careers advisers and will have much better specific contacts. Don’t be shy talking to lecturers with good reputations that don’t teach you specifically. Don’t be shy talking to anyone! …this is your career…you need to get talking, get networking and get on the ladder. If you don’t ask you don’t get in the jobs market…in a lot of ways it’s a lot like dating :slight_smile:

As for HR, Chris is right. Don’t feel shy calling them. It’s their JOB to look after their company’s staff, especially prospective employees like you! Get them on the phone and talk to them for as long as you want to!

Good luck!

Ed