Deloitte assessment day for tax

Deloitte

#1

Hi,

I have an assessment day at Deloitte next week (for tax) and would really appreciate some advice if anyone has already been through it.

Firstly, I was wandering how similar the process is across service lines? I can see there is a post on an assessment day for audit, but can I take that to be basically the same scenario as tax?

Also, could anyone give me some advice as to how to prepare for the commercial awareness side of the interview? Particularly, awareness of the business issues that Deloitte and other proffessional service firms face. I assume I will be asked about this fairly extensively but don’t really know how to get the information!

Thanks very much,

Frank.


#2

Hi,

I had an AC for Deloitte Corporate Tax a month or so ago, so I think I can prob help.

My day seemed pretty standard. I arrived and my first task was the e tray exercise. After answering the questions, I had to write a business email detailing which company I would recommend for a takeover.

The next stage was the interview. Both a partner and a senior manager came in. The Senior Manager spent about 20 mins quizzing me about the choice of company I had made for the takeover. There is no right answer, so you will always be ‘attacked’ for your choice. I got asked quite a few business specific questions and my economics A level was a lot of help in this area…don’t know if you do a business degree or anything but I was asked a lot of quite specific questions both in this section and the partner interview.

After the grilling was over it was the partner’s turn. This section lasted about 45 mins then I got the chance to ask questions. I found this section the hardest as I really did not know what was going to come up next. He was not nasty, but he did ask probing questions. I had to strongly justify my career choices and show I had a real interest in business. My degree is HIstory, and this had a lot to do with it, its not a standard degreee for the job. I also got asked the current state of affairs in the U.K with regards to Corporate Tax. This threw me, I had business stories I could talk about but only knew a little about Tax specifics. I did not answer very well, but this was ok. He said we are not expected to know really, and proceeded to tell me. He then asked me to comment on this, and I had to talk at some length about my thoughts and how I would act if I was leading a Corp Tax department in this situation.

He also asked me specifics about the qualification and picked up on my one low grade during uni. I gave the honest answer that I did not work hard enough in that module, and said I had learnt from it. I don’t think I would have passed if I had tried to waffle some answer together, I think he would have picked up on it in a second.

At the end of the interview there was time for questions. I found out both my interviewers had come over from Arthur Andersen, so I used this oppurtunity to mention Enron and Sarbanes-Oxley and show I had some industry knowledge. I also asked about the exams and the kind of clients they have. I also asked about whether there was much conflict with HMRC just out of pure interest.

That is about all I can think of at the moment really. I also got asked the standard “Why Deloitte”, “Why Corp Tax” and “Why not another big 4?” and whether I had applied to the other Big 4.

Hope this is off some help. I was phoned the next morning and offered the post, and received my info thorugh the post a few days later.

Any questions please ask.

Cheers


#3

Cheers, that is a lot of help, think I basically know what to expect now :slight_smile:


#4

Actually Mike I do have one question; I have applied to indirect tax, but would you know of any general issues in tax that deloitte faces? For example more aggressive stance from hmrc, or anything like that?

Thanks again,

Frank.


#5

Not a huge lot I am afraid. I know that tax in general is becoming more complicated but not a lot other than that…For my interview the only tax stuff I really looked at where stories which had been in media recently…eg tax on non-doms.

So all I can say is that the tax sector in general is becoming more complex.

Sorry I can’t be a whole lot of help. Guess a lot of the knowledge I will get with regards to tax and stuff will come once I start the job and become experience.

Perhaps someone working in Accountancy/Tax already can help?


#6

[QUOTE=Mike86;905]Hi,

I had an AC for Deloitte Corporate Tax a month or so ago, so I think I can prob help.

My day seemed pretty standard. I arrived and my first task was the e tray exercise. After answering the questions, I had to write a business email detailing which company I would recommend for a takeover.

The next stage was the interview. Both a partner and a senior manager came in. The Senior Manager spent about 20 mins quizzing me about the choice of company I had made for the takeover. There is no right answer, so you will always be ‘attacked’ for your choice. I got asked quite a few business specific questions and my economics A level was a lot of help in this area…don’t know if you do a business degree or anything but I was asked a lot of quite specific questions both in this section and the partner interview.

After the grilling was over it was the partner’s turn. This section lasted about 45 mins then I got the chance to ask questions. I found this section the hardest as I really did not know what was going to come up next. He was not nasty, but he did ask probing questions. I had to strongly justify my career choices and show I had a real interest in business. My degree is HIstory, and this had a lot to do with it, its not a standard degreee for the job. I also got asked the current state of affairs in the U.K with regards to Corporate Tax. This threw me, I had business stories I could talk about but only knew a little about Tax specifics. I did not answer very well, but this was ok. He said we are not expected to know really, and proceeded to tell me. He then asked me to comment on this, and I had to talk at some length about my thoughts and how I would act if I was leading a Corp Tax department in this situation.

He also asked me specifics about the qualification and picked up on my one low grade during uni. I gave the honest answer that I did not work hard enough in that module, and said I had learnt from it. I don’t think I would have passed if I had tried to waffle some answer together, I think he would have picked up on it in a second.

At the end of the interview there was time for questions. I found out both my interviewers had come over from Arthur Andersen, so I used this oppurtunity to mention Enron and Sarbanes-Oxley and show I had some industry knowledge. I also asked about the exams and the kind of clients they have. I also asked about whether there was much conflict with HMRC just out of pure interest.

That is about all I can think of at the moment really. I also got asked the standard “Why Deloitte”, “Why Corp Tax” and “Why not another big 4?” and whether I had applied to the other Big 4.

Hope this is off some help. I was phoned the next morning and offered the post, and received my info thorugh the post a few days later.

Any questions please ask.

Cheers[/QUOTE]

-did you practise the etray on any particular sites? and was it quite straight forward ?

  • i also have tax final round any pointers as to what to focus on?

#7

I didn’t do any practice e-tray stuff, just looked at the info they give you on the deloitte site and what is on the wiki here for help. It was pretty straight forward, quite a few judgement calls but just keep a ‘hard working/conscientious’ mindset when you are answering them and I would think you would be fine. The business email section of it has no right answer, all the options have positives and negatives. Biggest tip for that section is make sure you can back up whichever option you choose, both in the email and the interview afterwards. Whatever you chose will be attacked, but just argue you corner and back yourself up with solid business arguments and you should be fine.

Other than that the only tips I would have for the final stage would be to think before answering any questions. Don’t rush into an answer or waffle about the first thing that comes into your head. I personally couldn’t answer one of the questions that well, and told the partner so. This was fine, as I could give good answers to some follow up questions.

Stay calm, do your prep and think before you speak and you should be fine!

Any more questions just feel free to ask!


#8

I think there is a link to an online practice e-tray from the page on Wikijob - its one for the Civil Service fast stream scheme.

The layout is identical to the one used by KPMG (and Deloitte as well i think) however the scenario is quite hard! I personally found it much harder than the actual KPMG e-tray, and you get no personalised feedback on it. I’d say its useful for getting an idea of what it will look like - but if you do have a go at it don’t read anything into how difficult you find it!


#9

Just got offered the job :slight_smile:

Overall found the day pretty straightforward, e-tray exercise was fine and I did not get the kind of grilling that I was expecting in the interview. Asked me a couple of competency questions, why I wanted to do tax and talked for a while about a business story.

If you want to try an e-tray exercise:

In-tray exercise

Similar to Deloitte’s one and gives you feedback on your answers.


#10

[QUOTE=Mike86;917]Not a huge lot I am afraid. I know that tax in general is becoming more complicated but not a lot other than that…For my interview the only tax stuff I really looked at where stories which had been in media recently…eg tax on non-doms.

So all I can say is that the tax sector in general is becoming more complex.

Sorry I can’t be a whole lot of help. Guess a lot of the knowledge I will get with regards to tax and stuff will come once I start the job and become experience.

Perhaps someone working in Accountancy/Tax already can help?[/QUOTE]

The indirect tax senior manager that interviewed me at EY was very helpful for this. He said legislation is actually changing faster in corporate tax than indirect tax. 99% of their work is VAT because VAT legislation is complicated and companies get a bit lost in it. He also told me the answer to the $64k question of what you will be doing in your first year. In indirect tax, he said that you do no compliance work whatsoever, what you do a lot of is selling. This is because you need to convince clients that you can save them money - companies need audit, but often don’t think they need indirect tax, so a lot of the work is creating your own business by selling your companies services. Both interviewers said that what they wanted to get across was the quantity of work necessary (10 hours per day when studying) so you need to be comfortable with this.

HTH